J is for Jabberwocky



In my ditsy moments, you know those moments when your brain refuses to communicate properly with your mouth, I have been on the receiving end of many a strange look by those subject to my nonsensical tongue. I’ve even been known to make up my own vocabulary during momentary brain freezes. Luckily, my fingers cooperate far better with my brain than my mouth, which as a writer is quite important.

The word jabberwocky, which I think is brilliant, originated in the 20th century and seems to have been coined by Lewis Carroll. It is the title of one of his nonsense poems in his novel, Through the Looking Glass. Here’s a taster of Carroll’s take on nonsensical language:

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

(From Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll)

Have you blurted out jabberwocky during those crazy times? Have you had any embarrassing moments when your mouth refuses to cooperate with your brain?

Comments

  1. It's a brilliant word...and wonderful on the ears too!
    Writer In Transit

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  2. It describes my tongue twisting gibberish down to a tee :)

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  3. I think I have mostly used spoonerisms. Not this. This sounds quite ditsy. :D
    Cheers,
    Seena

    #AtoZChallenge- J for Just Joking!

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    1. Welcome to my world of ditsyness :)

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  4. another tongue twister, already finding it difficult to cope with Keith's ramblings

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  5. I used to be a tour guide and sometimes I'd temporarily forget a word - not a complicated technical one, but an ordinary common one. I usually resorted to mime. If my tour group thought I was slightly odd, at least they were too polite to say so.

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    1. Sounds like fun. When I first came to Germany, I had to use a lot of mime. Works a treat :)

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  6. Just work it into your personality. Helps make you more versatile. Long as you are not calling your boss 'bitch' or 'nipples' by accident you're good. Or your minister.

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  7. Haha I love this- made up words are the best!

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    1. My made up words have caused a few raised eyebrows :)

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  8. Jabberwocky is a great lesson in how our language is structured. And kids love saying slithy toves.

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    1. I love saying slithy toves too :)

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  9. I enjoyed that poem when I was in school. I liked saying "Twas brillig." Don't ask why.
    Visiting from AtoZ
    Wendy
    Jollett Etc.

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  10. I LOVE this poem! In high school I wrote and illustrated a Jabberwocky dictionary, in which I defined all the words how I thought they should be defined. One word in the poem has gone mainstream, chortle... such a lovely word!

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    1. I chortle a lot :) What a great activitiy - making your own Jabberwocky dictionary. Very cool.

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  11. I feel like I have those moments A LOT! Especially with teaching. There are so many times when my brain gets too far ahead of my mouth. Ha! There have definitely been some embarrassing moments too. Especially when teaching middle school students, who can turn anything and everything into something crazy! Thanks for visiting my blog! Loved this post!

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    1. I loved the challenge of teaching middle school kids. They brightened my day without fail :)

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  12. I know first thing in the morning I don't make much sense...

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    1. Luckily, I don't have to speak to anyone before 11am and several coffees :)

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  13. I tend to twist the order of the words around. It usually happens when my mouth gets ahead of the brain. And, I'll be talking about Lewis Carroll for the letter L.

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    1. Can't wait to read your 'L'. Super.

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    2. Can't wait to read your 'L' post.

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  14. I have to admit, I have no idea what's being said in that poem...although I'm usually no better when my mouth can't catch up to my brain.

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    1. Don't you just hate when that happens? :):)

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  15. Malapropisms, spoonerisms, or just plain twisting of the tongue, it does happen, and sometimes it's hilarious. Jabberwocky is a fun poem to teach to children, they love the nonsense words.

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    1. I used to love teaching nonsense poems. The kids came up with some hilarious poems of their own.

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  16. It always feels so odd to completely screw up words, but it happens, and I figure the pistons just aren't firing. LOL

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    1. Well, Yolanda you didn't mess up any words in your new novel. I am absolutely loving it!! I'm a slow reader so it will take a while before I can review it but it's a super read!!

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  17. there have been plenty of times i've quoted Jabberwocky when I was lacking something to say. It's so perfect.

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    1. I'll have to learn more Jabberwocky, so I can used it more often. Maybe I'll borrow Bish's Jabberwocky dictionary :)

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  18. I love C. S. Lewis and his words. Jabberwocky is how I feel at times when I talk. Writing does flow more easily. Time to think about your thoughts and edit. lol
    I'm trying to catch up with everyone tonight. Thanks for visiting my blog.

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    1. I would like to agree Ann - about writing flowing more easily - but I have to admit my early morning blogposts have suffered some jabberwocky :) started before my coffee had time to work :)

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  19. Love this. Happens when I'm tired.

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  20. All the time -- usually when I am exhausted or flustered! I wondered if anyone would use jabberwocky for today. Thanks for visiting my blog today.

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    1. I'm loving your A to Z posts, Roland! Such a creative theme. Fantastic conversations. Learning a lot :)

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  21. Love that word and yes, occasionally the actual words don't match what's in the head!

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    1. Thank you for popping by, Rosemary.

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  22. Actually, Carroll wrote The Jabberwock in the 19th century, not the 20th. I memorized all of the Alice poems in my childhood, and I'll bet I could recite almost all of them by heart to this day!

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    1. The Jabberwock was written in 1871, you are right but Oxford dictionary states that the origin of the word jabberwocky came about in the 20th century: from the title of Carroll's poem.

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