Perseverance and Perspective




Following my September recipe, a fellow blogger and short story writer, Wendy Clarke, reminded me of an important ingredient necessary for writers: perseverence.

The definition of perseverance according to my trusted Oxford English Dictionary is: continue in a course of action even in the face of difficulty or with little or no indication of success.

Wendy’s comment came just at the right time as I had received another rejection for a short story. It is always a bitter pill to swallow. We’ve all experienced it. The feeling of that sharp blade entering one’s vital organ. The day we don’t put pen to paper because we think we can’t write. So how do we cope with the knock backs?

I usually phone my mom or my daughter who have patience with me during my doom and gloom moments. They are incredible women and always manage to drag me out of the pit of self-pity. It doesn’t usually take very long once I’ve ranted for a few minutes. I bounce pretty well.

I also have a moan via email with my writing friend but I didn’t press SEND this time. The word PERSPECTIVE stopped me. Lately, life has dealt her a much more difficult hand of cards to deal with than a simple rejection. A rejection isn’t threatening, it’s not a personal attack and it won’t affect life in general. It is what it is: a few words stating this time the story didn’t make the cut.

All in all, I have had a successful September and am looking forward to enjoying another month filled with writing. I’m particularly excited to be interviewing author Karen Walker about her new novel, The Wishing Steps. This will take place 14th October, so please do come along and meet Karen.

How do you deal with rejection? Did you have a successful September? What are your October goals?  

Comments

  1. Another ingredient for writing success...a spouse who will support you :O]

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  2. Perseverance is much like faith.
    Rejections suck, but now you're one closer to an acceptance.

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  3. I usually reread the story, rejig it and send it on its way, Nicola - unless I get a whole load at once, then I pretend they don't exist for a couple of days - then reread and rejig :-) Glad you had a good September - hope October is even better xx

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    1. Thank you, Teresa. I love Autumn :) Already rejigged and sent off :)

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  4. I'm like you, Nic, I don't handle rejection well. Over the years, I've grown a tougher skin with regard to my writing. But ultimately, I need to get to a place where I know I gave it my best shot and some are going to like it and some aren't. Getting published is a complicated issue. Glad you have resources you can turn to when it all gets you down. And I can't wait for our interview. Thanks again for all your support.

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    1. Looking forward to hearing all about The Wishing Steps, Karen. Thank you for popping by to comment.

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  5. Perseverance and stickability. I once persevered with a story and sold it 25 years after writing it. I'm well qualified in perseverance, don't you think?

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    1. I think you are the champion of perseverance, Lynne :)

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  6. Good luck to your friend. Congratulations on your perspective and perserverance.

    After reading everyone's (the blogosphere is full of them) painful responses to rejection letters it is a wonder anyone submits any at all. I have yet to do so because I see getting my work published as a job and I already have a full time job that pays bills and one as a mom to two school aged children so I don't want or need a third job.
    I write because I LOVE it. When I am ready for another job I will have a library's worth of work to hawk to agents, magazines, publishers; depending on what the market is doing at that date in the future.
    Good luck with your submissions.

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    1. Thank you, Kat. You have one of the best jobs in the world - being a mom. Have a great weekend.

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  7. I wrote for 20 years before my book finally hit shelves. Granted, I wasn't trying to get published all of those years...but there were a LOT of rejections during that time.

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    1. Let's hope it doesn't take me 20 years or I will be a pensioner living on the streets :) Thanks for commenting Stephanie.

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  8. "in the face of difficulty or with little or no indication of success."

    A rejection certainly isn't an indication of success - but it doesn't mean you didn't come close and it doesn't mean you won't be successful next time - either with that story elsewhere, or a different one to the same place.

    I deal with rejection by always having lots of work 'out there' so the next post or email could bring good news and by trying to remember it's not me, or my writing in general which has been rejected - it's just that piece for that market at that time.

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    1. A great viewpoint, Patsy. Thank you for taking the time to comment. Always lovely to see you.

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  9. When I receive a rejection, I've trained myself to think, 'Your loss,' and send elsewhere!

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    1. It is most definitely a learning process and training to cope is essential. Thanks for commenting. Refuse you?? They need there heads seeing to :) Wishing you continued success.

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  10. Sorry about that rejection, Nicola, but it's par for the course with writing - for every single writer I've ever known. It's so difficult fitting the few markets that are left these days so do keep redrafting (if necessary) and submitting elsewhere. The more you send out, the bigger your chance of acceptance - telling myself that too!

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    1. Thank you, Rosemary. That's exactly what I've learned to do. Wishing you lots of sales of 'Summer of the Eagles' and 'The Highland Lass'. And, I'll be thinking about Victoria and sending her lots of good vibes across the air waves.

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  11. I'm sorry for your rejection. Like you, I take a day or so, moan about it and then move on. A particularly hard one hit me last month. My agent shelved my book. I'd taken a year to write it and she said it needed more. I about wanted to cry and die and quit. Instead, I showed her another I had started and she loved that one. So I'm forward again --thankful for the lesson.

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    1. I'm sorry to hear your agent shelved your novel, Terri. What a big kick in the teeth. Maybe the timing was just not right and it will flourish at a later date. So pleased your moving forward with your WIP. Wishing you lots of success. Thank you for sharing!

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